Jess Jurick

Going to WordCamp Miami? Catch Jake and Jess! Jake will be debuting “What Would Core Do?” – a guide to building theme and plug-in administration that feels native – in the developer’s track. Meanwhile, Jess – a former Miami native and an organizer of WordCamp Miami 2010 – will offer insight into building communities around your online content. Hope we see you there!

Editing WordPress's Visual Editor

These are the slides from a talk I gave at the 2011 WordCamps (WordPress conferences) in Chicago, Philly, and Orlando. I consider this a “sequel” to a broader talk on editing the WordPress administrative experience that I like to think I pioneered in 2010 at a few WordCamps, including Chicago and Mid-Alantic, which several new speakers now seem to be running with.

WordPress’s visual content editor (TinyMCE) is, in many ways, at the heart of WordPress’s content management experience. It’s where editors spend most of their time, and where content is crafted to appear on the front end of your site. Like most of WordPress, the editor can be customized to be both more powerful and more specific to the needs of an individual site or client. This presentation covers topics inlcuding custom editor stylesheets based on post type, modifying and removing buttons from the editor, and even creating your own custom buttons for the TinyMCE toolbar. It even covers brand new WordPress 3.3 techniques introduced with the new wp_editor function.

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The Perks of Contributing

Behold this glorious little section of the WordPress 3.3 credits page.

I’m never in anything for the recognition or glory, but I have to admit: this is pretty exciting. As of this writing, WordPress powers 15.7% of the top million websites and at least 22% of all new active websites in the US. That is a mind-blowing number of times that the faces and names on the credits page might be seen, even given that it’s buried a little in the admin.

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Jake, Helen take WordCamp Philly 2011

Had a great time with Helen at WordCamp Philly. In case you missed it, Helen was one of four panelists speaking to WordPress in higher education during lunch, where she discussed her experience rolling out the Eastman School of Music’s website in WordPress. Helen was the only panelist from a consulting shop. I shared my Editing the Visual Editor talk in the developer track. The presentation was updated to incorporate a new tip and feature some of the relevant new tools WordPress 3.3 – and the new wp_editor function – put at our finger tips. Both of us also participated in the core development session on Sunday, and submitted core patches.

Great crowd at the Rhode Island Foundation

Having a great time presenting an introduction to WordPress to a fun crowd at the Rhode Island Foundation for the Breakfast with an Expert series.

Introducing WordPress as a CMS

A week and a half later, here are the slides from my WordCamp Boston 2011 talk, “Introducing WordPress as a CMS”. Unfortunately, the slides don’t include my live demo of some CMS-centric implementations, which I think was eye opening to a few participants.

None-the-less, if you’re looking for an overview of content management concepts applied to WordPress, you can find them here. I’ve uploaded the slideshow as a video to YouTube (to preserve its feel); the video moves quickly, so you might have to be quick on the pause button!

Wrapping up WordCamp Boston 2011

WordCamp Boston 2011 was every bit as informative, fun, and inspiring as we expected.

Like most great WordCamps, Boston wasn’t just a venue for some great sessions; it was an opportunity to chat it up with a diverse crowd that ranged from lead WordPress contributors to new users just discovering the ways they can use the booming content management system. On Saturday morning – the first day of the event – I finally found the time and inspiration to send in a short sponsorship blog post. Recalling memories of WordCamp Boston 2010, I was excited for the event, and it didn’t disappoint.

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A little freebie: WordPress folder icon

WordPress folder icon previewAt 10up, are freebies usually come in the form of WordPress code: tips, themes, and plug-ins. While a bit atypical, I wanted to share this folder icon we designed from scratch. It incorporates the WordPress logo, which is available here in vector format.

Designed with the gray WordPress color palette in  mind, this icon can add some flair to your WordPress folder(s) on your computer. There’s a full sized, beautiful 256px version, along with a small version fine tuned for the common 16px icon size.

We’re providing them for free with a GPL license, in original vector (Adobe Illustrator CS5 and SVG) formats as well as 256px PNG format and Windows ICO format. As always, we do politely request that if you use these for a client or commercial project, please give us attribution. Donations are welcome!

Download now.

Upcoming WordCamp Sessions

I’m excited to announce that I’ll be speaking again at both WordCamp Boston and WordCamp Chicago in July.

In Boston, I’ll be introducing newer users to approaching WordPress as a full fledged content management system. We’ll explore what a “full fledged CMS” actually means, and how to approach defining your requirements and thinking about your content. We’ll take a look at the administrative section of some complex CMS implementations to show what’s really possible. Then we’ll put ideas and strategy aside and review some configuration options and plug-ins that even the most basic users can latch onto to get started. My session is on Sunday, July 24th at 1:30 pm in the “How To” track. I’ll be attending all weekend, so be sure to find me and say hi!

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Secondary HTML Content 3.0 preview

As much as we like giving back to the community, it’s often hard to find time to keep some of the more sophisticated plug-ins up to date. One plug-in that hasn’t been updated in some time that I am frequently asked about is Secondary HTML Content.

I’ve had a number of ambitious goals for 3.0 for some time:

  • Enable a more complete editor experience (notably, Visual / HTML tabs)
  • Allow users to customize the labels for each content block
  • Add support for custom post types (not just posts and pages)
  • Remove arbitrary limit of 5 editor blocks
  • Integrate the settings with the “Writing” settings page (a logical place for them; I’m make a conscious effort with my themes and plug-ins to not “clutter” the settings panel)
  • On top of all this, provide a seamless upgrade path for 2.0 users

The first bullet has been by far the most challenging. While WordPress has a number of core functions that simplify adding a visual editor, they simply weren’t built with multiple editors on one page in mind. For the technically savvy, there are many hardcoded ID attributes, interacting with both CSS and JavaScript that rely on those IDs. As we know, the DOM is not intended to have multiple elements with identical IDs (particularly when we’re hooking events with JavaScript).

Nonetheless, I’m excited to say that the biggest hurdles have been tackled. Since we can’t work on hobby projects full time, the release is probably at least a couple of weeks out, mostly having to do with the upgrade path code.